How to Upload more Gamma?

One of the most significant discoveries of all time was made during the 2nd half of the 20th century. It is now known that gamma brain waves have the smallest amplitude and fastest brainwave frequency. The gamma wave, which typically has a frequency of 40 Hz, can increase the overall quality of life, enhance cognition and mindfulness. More importantly, this brain frequency can be harnessed to boost cognitive abilities. This can result in higher clarity, expedited problem solving, better concentration and an overall increase in human efficiency. Gamma waves are associated with better cognitive functioning, along with feelings of compassion, happiness and relaxation (Basar, 2017, p. 165). 

The Absence of Gamma is Harmful 

Conversely, in the absence of adequate gamma brainwaves production, humans are vulnerable to multitude of symptoms. This can range from panic attacks, anxiety, insomnia and sleep deprivation. In severe cases, the lack of gamma wave production can lead to cognitive degeneration, memory loss and diseases like Alzheimer’s (Basar, 2017, p. 165). 

Human beings can harness these methods to increase gamma waves’ flow in the brain:

  1. Meditation

It is one of the simplest ways to alter the brainwaves and we will feel less stressed and more centred. Regular meditation (this includes meditation -in-motion, yoga) is a relatively faster method to trigger gamma wave activity within the brain. It has been observed that students practicing Bhramari Pranayama (a breathing technique method) generated high frequency gamma waves. According to researchers who have studied yoga teacher training, yoga does produce a high volume of gamma waves inside the brain. Monks and nuns have been observed with having the highest level of concentration and cognitive functioning. Yoga is a popular practice in Portugal (Desai, 2015, p. 118). There are many yoga studios all over Portugal, including some well known ones at Praia da Rocha Beach and Algarve (Castelo, 2010, p. 113).

2. Brainwave Entrainment

Brainwave entrainment is a process that trains the human brain to produce brainwaves of a specific frequency. With the help of a brainwave entrainment specialist, a brain can be trained to produce waves that are the difference between two different frequencies sent into the same ear. It is one of the many ways to escalate gamma wave production inside the brain (Basar, 2013, p. 248).

3. Listening Music Using Binaural Beats 

The binaural beats can naturally produce gamma brainwaves inside a human brain. This can result in improvement of long-term memory and trigger bettered data processing functions. On the other hand, it could also be used to prevent memory deterioration in the future. Apart from this, gamma waves at 40 Hz initiate a therapeutic response for a listener since neural connections are improved (Le Scouranec, 2016, p. 58). 

For listening to binaural beats, an individual would require stereo headphones and an MP3 player. It is advised to refrain from tasks that require undivided attention, the likes of which includes driving or reading (Le Scouranec, 2016, p. 58). The individual requires the following:

  • Patience
  • A quiet place
  • 30 minutes of continuous listening 
  • Stereo headphones since each ear hears sound at a different frequency

For a bolstered effect, music can be plugged in while performing yoga and meditation (Le Scouranec, 2016, p. 58).

4. Isochronic Tones

Isochronic tone is an audio-based method to stimulate the neural activity. They are known to be fast and helps in improving energy levels, relaxation, heightens focus and improve sleep cycles. Isochronic tones can improve all of these in a human without requiring an external source (Basar, 2013, p. 248).

In essence, the isochronic tones simply guide the dominant brainwave to another frequency as an individual listen to it, allowing a sudden change in mental state and how an individual feels. The effects of these tones are instantaneous. They are regular beats of one tone only. During listening, the isochronic tone is simply turned on and off very speedily (Basar, 2013, p. 248).  

Scientifically-proven Benefits of Gamma Brainwaves

Studies have shown that individuals with heightened gamma waves activity are exceptionally compassionate, intelligent, happy and have photographic memories. Similarly, their IQ scores are also higher than other individuals. As high gamma production is correlated with peak performance, famous musicians, elite athletes and high achievers have maximum production of gamma waves (Ernest, 2018, p. 529).

People with very high levels of gamma activity have shown scientifically that they are more intelligent, compassionate, happy, and have excellent memories and strong self-control. IQ scores of people with high gamma wave activity are correspondingly high (Ernest, 2018, p. 529).

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References

  • Başar, E., Başar-Eroglu, C., Karakaş, S. and Schürmann, M., 2013. Gamma, alpha, delta, and theta oscillations govern cognitive processes. International journal of psychophysiology39(2-3), pp.241-248.
  • Başar, E., Başar-Eroğlu, C., Karakaş, S. and Schürmann, M., 2017. Are cognitive processes manifested in event-related gamma, alpha, theta and delta oscillations in the EEG?. Neuroscience letters, 259(3), pp.165-168.
  • Castelo, R.M.A., 2010. Business plan for a health club (Doctoral dissertation). 
  • Desai, R., Tailor, A. and Bhatt, T., 2015. Effects of yoga on brain waves and structural activation: A review. Complementary therapies in clinical practice21(2), pp.112-118.
  • Ernest, N.C.H., 2018. Mindfulness and Buddhist economics in the financial market–generating Delta or Alpha? Society and Economy. In Central and Eastern Europe ǀ Journal of the Corvinus University of Budapest, 40(4), pp.515-529.
  • Kaufman, M., 2013. Meditation gives brain a charge, study finds. Washington Post3, p.2005.
  • Le Scouranec, R.P., Poirier, R.M., Owens, J.E. and Gauthier, J., 2016. Use of binaural beat tapes for treatment of anxiety: a pilot study of tape preference and outcomes. Alternative therapies in health and medicine, 7(1), p.58.

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